Children

Hello! Welcome to the children’s area, where we offer some helpful advice that you and your family can use.

Explore the children’s area even if you cannot see a particular difficulty listed, it may help you to identify what is happening or you can just browse and use the advice to help you. You may also want to watch our videos that have been created to help you understand a bit more about our service.

Talking to someone who knows you, such as your parent’s, carer’s or teacher might be helpful. If needed, you and they can then speak to your school nurse, GP or teacher who will ask you to tell them about what kinds of difficulties you are experiencing and to help think about what sort of support you might need.

Lots of people have worries and that is a normal part of life. Sometimes you might feel like they are taking over your brain, which can be upsetting. Sometimes these things don’t make a lot of sense, like checking over and over again, or worrying all the time about your mum, dad or carer.

Bullying is when people hurt or upset you, threaten you, hit or kick you, call you names, spread stories or try to make you look silly. This can happen in lots of ways, including on the internet or by phone. It can happen at school or outside of school, such as in clubs or groups.

The most important thing is to tell someone you trust, we understand this might be hard and scary, but there are lots of things you can do to stop bullies. It helps to learn ways to stand up to bullies, don’t believe what bullies tell you, being bullied is not your fault.

If you would like some more information, advice or help, visit these websites:

Lots of people have worries and that is a normal part of life. Sometimes you might feel like they are taking over your brain, which can be upsetting. Sometimes these things don’t make a lot of sense, like checking over and over again, or worrying all the time about your mum, dad or carer.

When someone you are close to dies, this could be a family member, friend or even a pet, dealing with how you feel can be very hard, but it’s normal to feel sad, angry, confused and hurt.

Crying is a really good way of letting the feelings out, or try drawing or writing them down. Don’t be afraid to talk about who has died. This will help you to remember them and helps the way you feel.

If you would like some more information, advice or help, visit these websites:

There are many reasons why families split up and it is a difficult time for everyone. There might be fights or arguments at home which make you feel unhappy, confused and scared. When your family splits up it can mean that changes are going to take place, like having to live with only one parent or not seeing one parent much anymore.

Remember it’s parents who decide to separate, it’s their decision and something you could not have stopped.

It’s certainly not your fault. They are separating from each other not you. You are not alone and talking about how you feel can make you feel better.

Feeling angry is a normal emotion, the same as feeling sad, worried or happy. When your angry feelings become out of control it can cause lots of problems, upset and hurt you and other people. Sometimes when we have angry feelings we might feel confused and may not understand what is making us become out of control and behave in ways that we feel bad about after.

Who is a young carer?

A young carer is a child/young person under the age of 18 who looks after a brother, sister, parent or grandparent who may be disabled, ill, have a mental health problem or misuse alcohol or drugs.

Young carers day to day caring responsibilities can include:

  • Cooking
  • Cleaning
  • Shopping
  • Listening
  • Helping someone get up, washing and dressing them

How might being a young carer affect me?

Being a young carer can affect young people in many different ways.

  • You may feel tired because of all the extra things they do.
  • You may fall behind in your school work.
  • You can feel lonely, isolated and scared.
  • You can feel anxious and worried about who you care for.
  • You may be teased or bullied at school because you are a young carer.

Finding help

Being a young carer affects young people in different ways. There are Young Carers Services within Torbay where you can speak to someone who understands what it is like to be a young carer, meet other young people like yourself, join in activities where you have fun and have a break from caring.

If you think you might be a young carer or you are a young carer and need help and advice, speak to an adult you trust like your parent, carer or school teacher. They will be able to get in touch with the Young Carers Service in your local area and make a referral. Or you can contact them yourself by email or phone;

Email: youngcarers@torbay.gov.uk
Tel: 01803 208655

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